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Automated spectroscopic abundances of A and F-type stars using echelle spectrographs. II. Abundances of 140 A-F stars from ELODIE
Using the method presented in Erspamer & North (\cite{erspamer},hereafter Paper I), detailed abundances of 140 stars are presented. Theuncertainties characteristic of this method are presented and discussed.In particular, we show that for a S/N ratio higher than 200, the methodis applicable to stars with a rotational velocity as high as 200 kms-1. There is no correlation between abundances and Vsin i,except a spurious one for Sr, Sc and Na which we explain by the smallnumber of lines of these elements combined with a locally biasedcontinuum. Metallic giants (Hauck \cite{hauck}) show larger abundancesthan normal giants for at least 8 elements: Al, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Niand Ba. The anticorrelation for Na, Mg, Si, Ca, Fe and Ni with Vsin isuggested by Varenne & Monier (\cite{varenne99}) is not confirmed.The predictions of the Montréal models (e.g. Richard et al.\cite{richard01}) are not fulfilled in general. However, a correlationbetween left [(Fe)/(H)right ] and log g is found for stars of 1.8 to 2.0M_sun. Various possible causes are discussed, but the physical realityof this correlation seems inescapable.Based on observations collected at the 1.93 m telescope at theObservatoire de Haute-Provence (St-Michel l'Observatoire, France) andCORALIE.Based on observations collected at the Swiss 1.2 m Leonard Eulertelescopes at the European Southern Observatory (La Silla, Chile).Tables 5 and 6 are only available in electronic form at the CDS viaanonymous ftp to cdsarc.u.strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or viahttp://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/398/1121

Elemental abundance analyses with DAO spectrograms. XXVI. The superficially normal stars gamma Serpentis (F6 V) and 101 Herculis (A7 V)
Elemental abundances analyses of the superfically normal stars gamma Ser(F6 V) and 101 Herculis (A7 V) consistent with previous studies of thisseries using photographic region spectrograms obtained with Reticon andCCD detectors produced derived values that are generally solar exceptfor Al which is very underabundant and the rare earths which do not havethe solar pattern. Similar discrepancies from solar values are seen inother superficially normal stars of this series with similartemperatures. Our results for gamma Ser are in acceptable agreement withother recent studies based on different techniques and spectral regions.Table 3 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymousftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or viahttp://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/394/187

Rotational velocities of A-type stars in the northern hemisphere. II. Measurement of v sin i
This work is the second part of the set of measurements of v sin i forA-type stars, begun by Royer et al. (\cite{Ror_02a}). Spectra of 249 B8to F2-type stars brighter than V=7 have been collected at Observatoirede Haute-Provence (OHP). Fourier transforms of several line profiles inthe range 4200-4600 Å are used to derive v sin i from thefrequency of the first zero. Statistical analysis of the sampleindicates that measurement error mainly depends on v sin i and thisrelative error of the rotational velocity is found to be about 5% onaverage. The systematic shift with respect to standard values fromSlettebak et al. (\cite{Slk_75}), previously found in the first paper,is here confirmed. Comparisons with data from the literature agree withour findings: v sin i values from Slettebak et al. are underestimatedand the relation between both scales follows a linear law ensuremath vsin inew = 1.03 v sin iold+7.7. Finally, thesedata are combined with those from the previous paper (Royer et al.\cite{Ror_02a}), together with the catalogue of Abt & Morrell(\cite{AbtMol95}). The resulting sample includes some 2150 stars withhomogenized rotational velocities. Based on observations made atObservatoire de Haute Provence (CNRS), France. Tables \ref{results} and\ref{merging} are only available in electronic form at the CDS viaanonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.125.5) or viahttp://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/393/897

A spectroscopic survey for lambda Bootis stars. II. The observational data
lambda Bootis stars comprise only a small number of all A-type stars andare characterized as nonmagnetic, Population i, late B to early F-typedwarfs which show significant underabundances of metals whereas thelight elements (C, N, O and S) are almost normal abundant compared tothe Sun. In the second paper on a spectroscopic survey for lambda Bootisstars, we present the spectral classifications of all program starsobserved. These stars were selected on the basis of their Strömgrenuvbybeta colors as lambda Bootis candidates. In total, 708 objects insix open clusters, the Orion OB1 association and the Galactic field wereclassified. In addition, 9 serendipity non-candidates in the vicinity ofour program stars as well as 15 Guide Star Catalogue stars were observedresulting in a total of 732 classified stars. The 15 objects from theGuide Star Catalogue are part of a program for the classification ofapparent variable stars from the Fine Guidance Sensors of the HubbleSpace Telescope. A grid of 105 MK standard as well as ``pathological''stars guarantees a precise classification. A comparison of our spectralclassification with the extensive work of Abt & Morrell(\cite{Abt95}) shows no significant differences. The derived types are0.23 +/- 0.09 (rms error per measurement) subclasses later and 0.30 +/-0.08 luminosity classes more luminous than those of Abt & Morrell(\cite{Abt95}) based on a sample of 160 objects in common. The estimatederrors of the means are +/- 0.1 subclasses. The characteristics of oursample are discussed in respect to the distribution on the sky, apparentvisual magnitudes and Strömgren uvbybeta colors. Based onobservations from the Observatoire de Haute-Provence, OsservatorioAstronomico di Padova-Asiago, Observatório do Pico dosDias-LNA/CNPq/MCT, Chews Ridge Observatory (MIRA) and University ofToronto Southern Observatory (Las Campanas).

Research Note Hipparcos photometry: The least variable stars
The data known as the Hipparcos Photometry obtained with the Hipparcossatellite have been investigated to find those stars which are leastvariable. Such stars are excellent candidates to serve as standards forphotometric systems. Their spectral types suggest in which parts of theHR diagrams stars are most constant. In some cases these values stronglyindicate that previous ground based studies claiming photometricvariability are incorrect or that the level of stellar activity haschanged. Table 2 is only available in electronic form at the CDS viaanonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or viahttp://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/367/297

The Relation between Rotational Velocities and Spectral Peculiarities among A-Type Stars
Abstract image available at:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-bib_query?1995ApJS...99..135A&db_key=AST

Vitesses radiales. Catalogue WEB: Wilson Evans Batten. Subtittle: Radial velocities: The Wilson-Evans-Batten catalogue.
We give a common version of the two catalogues of Mean Radial Velocitiesby Wilson (1963) and Evans (1978) to which we have added the catalogueof spectroscopic binary systems (Batten et al. 1989). For each star,when possible, we give: 1) an acronym to enter SIMBAD (Set ofIdentifications Measurements and Bibliography for Astronomical Data) ofthe CDS (Centre de Donnees Astronomiques de Strasbourg). 2) the numberHIC of the HIPPARCOS catalogue (Turon 1992). 3) the CCDM number(Catalogue des Composantes des etoiles Doubles et Multiples) byDommanget & Nys (1994). For the cluster stars, a precise study hasbeen done, on the identificator numbers. Numerous remarks point out theproblems we have had to deal with.

Reliable photometric reductions to the standard UBV (or uvby) system and accurate UBV magnitudes of bright standard stars from the northern part of the international Be program
A modified method of computer reduction of UBV (or uvby) photoelectricobservations to standard systems, which combines advantages of what hasso far been achieved in this area, is described in detail. A completereduction of over 46000 UBV observations obtained at Hvar Observatorybetween 1972 and 1991, and of nearly 5000 UBV observations secured atSkalnate Pleso Observatory between 1980 and 1987, was carried out usingthe new technique. It is argued that replacing the original Johnson'sUBV values for the non-variable stars that were observed by the meanvalues based on repeated observations over several years and applyingthe new reduction technique can ensure a stable reproduction of UBVmagnitudes, obviously quite close to the standard Johnson's ones, overmany years and from observatories situated at very different altitudesabove sea level within about 0.01mag in all three UBV magnitudes. A listof new accurate mean UBV values of 191 stars which were regularlyobserved at Hvar - and a part of them also at Skalnate Pleso - ascomparison, check and standard stars in the Be- and Ap-star observingprograms, is included for future use by photometric observers in theNorthern Hemisphere. For a number of these stars, we can guaranteesecular constancy within 0.mag01 during the past 5 to 15 years.

Three known and twenty-two new variable stars of early spectral type
Photoelectric photometry is reported of three known and 22 newvariables, all brighter than V = 7.5 mag. The three known ones are: theellipsoidal variable 42 (V467) Per, the Beta Cep-type star HR 6684 =V2052 Oph, and the eclipsing variable HR 8854 = V649 Cas. The newvariable stars are listed. They include two Beta Cep candidates, oneeclipsing and three ellipsoidal variables, a 'mid-B' variable, anAlpha(2) CVn variable, and two Lambda Eri stars. The twelve remainingnew variables could not be classified because of insufficient data. TheLambda Eri variables found in the present investigation, together withsome examples from the literature, indicate that rotational modulationoccurs not only in Be, but also in normal B stars.

Absolute dimensions of early-type eclipsing binary stars. II - AH Cephei
From a new spectroscopic study of the components of AH Cephei, and therecent light curve solution of Bell et al. (1986), new absolutedimensions are derived for the components of this early-type system.Measurements of equivalent width give a true light ratio of 1.3 + or -0.3. The absolute visual magnitudes are -3.5 + or - 0.4 and -3.3 + or -0.2, for the primary and secondary, respectively. These results showthat AH Cephei is a detached main-sequence system having an age of about6 million yr.

Metallicism among A and F giant stars
132 stars considered as A and F giants have been studied for theirproperties in the Geneva photometric system. It is shown that thissystem to derive the temperature, absolute magnitude and Fe/H value forstars in this part of the HR diagram. 36 percent of the stars of oursample exhibit an enhanced value Delta m2 that can be interpreted interms of Fe/H. The red limit of stars having an enhanced Fe/H value is0.225 in B2-V1 or 6500 K in Teff. This corresponds to the limit definedby Vauclair and Vauclair (1982) where the diffusion timescale is equalto the stellar lifetime and permits the assumption that the diffusion isthe process responsible for the metallicism observed in the A and Fgiants.

Catalogue of the energy distribution data in spectra of stars in the uniform spectrophotometric system.
Not Available

Principal components analysis of spectral data. I - Methodology for spectral classification
Principal components analysis is applied to published narrow-bandphotometric data on 53 standard stars of spectral types A and F.Correlations within the data are displayed and the propagation of errorsis discussed. Techniques for improving the precision and the efficiencyof the classification are explored, including non-linear regression andtrimming and grouping of the original data. As an example, a set of 47observed variables is reduced to 3, with no loss of precision.

Scanner studies of composite spectra. II - Giants and dwarfs
A set of line and continuum indices is calibrated as a function ofspectral type, over the range late O-early G for giants, using lowresolution scanner observations in the 3500-4400 A region. Line orfeature indices are defined for H-gamma, G band, Ca I (4227 A), Ca II(K), H 3889, and the Balmer jump. The combination of the results withthose for standard-luminosity class IV-V stars allows the analysis ofcomposite-spectrum objects. The spectrum scans of 58 visual,spectroscopic and eclipsing pairs are compared with a grid of calculatedcomposites, and a computer program is used to generate giant-giant,giant-dwarf and dwarf-dwarf pairs of composites for comparison withobservations. A set of 11 dwarf stars treated in Beavers and Cook (1980)is reexamined using a version of the computer program which fixesDelta(m) for the synthesis procedure to agree with values found in theliterature.

Narrow-band photometry of Beta Lyrae in 1971
Observations of Beta Lyrae (with HR 6997 as the principal companionstar) are presented, principally of certain strong lines and neighboringcontinuum regions obtained through interference filters of bandwidthsranging from 27.0 to 33.7 A. Light curves in the 3 blue and 3 red bandsare shown, and color indices and emission intensity indices aretabulated. Moreover, a photometric index of emission line strength,analogous to the spectroscopic index of Batten and Sahade (1973), isderived. It is suggested that the H alpha emission comes from a largerregion around the binary star than does the helium emission and isasymmetrical, being weakest near quadrature when the primary star isapproaching earth. The helium emission, by contrast, is moresymmetrical, and varies with binary phase by a larger fractional amount.

Prediction of spectral classification from photometric observations - Application of the UVBY beta photometry and the MK spectra classification. II - General case
Abstract image available at:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-bib_query?1980A&A....85...93M&db_key=AST

Prediction of spectral classification from photometric observations-application to the UVBY beta photometry and the MK spectral classification. I - Prediction assuming a luminosity class
An algorithm based on multiple stepwise and isotonic regressions isdeveloped for the prediction of spectral classification from photometricdata. The prediction assumes a luminosity class with reference touvbybeta photometry and the MK spectral classification. The precisionattained is about 90 percent and 80 percent probability of being withinone spectral subtype respectively for luminosity groups I and V and forluminosity groups III and IV. A list of stars for which discrepanciesappear between photometry and spectral classification is given.

Photoelectric K-line indices for 165 B, A and F stars.
Abstract image available at:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-bib_query?1978A&AS...34..441P&db_key=AST

Detection of errors in spectral classification by cluster analysis
Cluster analysis methods are applied to the photometric catalogue ofuvby-beta measurements by Hauck and Lindemann (1973) and point out 249stars the spectral type of which should be reconsidered or thephotometric indices of which should be redetermined.

Catalogue of early-type stars measured in a narrow-band photometric system
A compilation of the photoelectric measurements in the Barbier-Morguleffsystem is presented. The catalogue includes data for 773 stars ofspectral type 08 to F6. 706 stars have been measured at least twice.

Photoelectric observations of β LYR in 1971
Abstract image available at:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-bib_query?1974A&AS...13..405C&db_key=AST

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Observation and Astrometry data

Constellation:Hercules
Right ascension:18h08m52.90s
Declination:+20°02'43.0"
Apparent magnitude:5.1
Distance:98.425 parsecs
Proper motion RA:10
Proper motion Dec:-20.3
B-T magnitude:5.301
V-T magnitude:5.121

Catalogs and designations:
Proper Names   (Edit)
Flamsteed101 Her
HD 1989HD 166230
TYCHO-2 2000TYC 1575-1960-1
USNO-A2.0USNO-A2 1050-09796636
BSC 1991HR 6794
HIPHIP 88899

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